Adi

Israeli Delegation, 1999

IMPACT: SOCIAL

How has Seeds of Peace had an impact on you?

My first time at Camp was the most memorable summer of my life. A large part of my national and political identity was introduced to me that summer, and the following years of Seeds of Peace meetings, activities, and summers at Camp enabled and encouraged me to develop these aspects of my identity.

Thanks to Seeds of Peace, I became aware of what it means to be a Jewish Israeli woman, and the benefits, challenges, advantages, and disadvantages that come with that identity. The encounters and close relationships with Palestinians, along with the awareness of who I am in the context of the Middle East conflict, instilled in me a sense of responsibility over the events that take place in Israel and the actions of the society of which I am a part.

How are you impacting your community?

I work to create social and political change inside Israeli society. I believe I have the power to influence only the society I live in—and have much less power outside of it—and that any progress made inside it contributes to ending the conflict and reaching a peaceful solution for Israelis and Palestinians.

In my professional work, I use two main tools, education and legal work, to fight against prejudice, discrimination and racism; to protect human rights; and to allow access to justice for disadvantaged groups in society. I draft bills to amend current laws regarding the status of women and spend much time recruiting parliament members and government officials to work with us in our struggle. I have learned that long-term commitment is necessary to impacting the legal, financial, and social spheres crucial to achieving real social change and lasting peace. There is no short or easy way.

WORK

• Head of Legislation and Advocacy, The Rackman Center for the Advancement of the Status of Women

“Both my motivation to do this work and my confidence in my ability to create change are a direct result of my Seeds of Peace experiences from 1999 up until today.”